The Price Tag for Beto’s Failed Presidential Run is Unbelievable

Well, it’s official. Former Texas congressman and 2020 presidential candidate Robert ‘Beto’ Francis O’Rourke has officially turned in his resignation to become president of the United States. Running polls at the very bottom of the over-crowded Democratic field let us know some time back that he probably wouldn’t make it anywhere close to the White House steps, but, apparently, he had to try anyway.

And as his campaign ends, the reports are flying in about how much he made, how much he spent, and what exactly his campaign amounted to before it tanked out completely. Let’s just say these totals don’t speak well of Beto at all.

From start to finish, Beto spent a whopping $14 million on his presidential campaign before it ran out of steam.

$14 million. While this isn’t anywhere close to the highest amount paid thus far or in the past for presidential campaigns, it is still a significant amount of money. And much more than some candidates who are still in the race have spent. All to be used on a lost cause.

Think of all the things that money could have been used for instead. Aren’t the Democrats always complaining about causes that don’t have enough funding? And yet this money didn’t go there. It went straight to the trash.

However, what is even more appalling is that not even a year ago, Beto O’Rourke ran another political campaign to oust Republican Senator Ted Cruz from his seat in Congress. He lost this one as well but spent even more money.

In fact, his race against Cruz proved to the most expensive race in US history, according to Fox News. They reported in October of 2018 that O’Rourke spent an outrageous $75 million only to lose. The winning Cruz only paid $45 million, which by the way is still a lot of dough.

However, O’Rourke would say that the enormous amount spent running against Cruz wasn’t all for naught. If he hadn’t spent that much, he wouldn’t have gained quite the publicity that he did. And that publicity and time in the limelight are what gave him and those who supported him the idea that he should be president.

Apparently, spending three terms in the House as a minority party member-only to lose your only statewide election gives you the credibility and experience needed to rule the entire nation.

So the question is now: What was all this for? I mean, I do have some respect for a person who knows when enough is enough, and there isn’t any reason to go on. But the fact still remains that Beto has spent over $90 million altogether on two campaigns completed in only a year.

And what does he have to show for it?

Absolutely nothing, except that everyone now knows he is really good at spending money on useless things.

Lots of ideas come to mind when thinking about spending that amount of money. Take, for example, some of the many issues that other candidates, including Beto, have been pushing in their campaigns.

The biggest one that comes to mind is Medicare for All. Now according to both Sanders’ and Warren’s plans for the idea, $90 million will not cover it. But it could help out.

Or what about changing immigration policies that Beto was so looking forward to? I’m sure that money could have gone to good use there.

And, of course, we can’t forget about Beto’s most crucial cause, taking guns away from law-abiding citizens. How many AR-15s do you think $90 million or even $14 million would have bought?

At least then Beto would have some high-powered rifles with which to shoot his frustration at losing out at the range.

Then again, since we are talking about taking away America’s Second Amendment rights, these “assault rifles” might be a bit more expensive.

One Twitter user responded to Beto’s failure and the amount of cash he burnt through by saying, “I’d have sold him one for 14 million.”

But others have more realistic notions about the money not so well spent.

“They preach about change that needs to happen and 14 million spent on a joke who had no chance to win. All of the money went to the establishment that they sit and complain about. I’m sure 14 million would have made a difference to a real cause.”

I couldn’t have said it better myself.